find the pit!

Discussion in 'The Sump' started by Romitaz, Apr 20, 2006.

  1. Romitaz

    Romitaz Black Perc

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  2. Coyle

    Coyle Ko-Ko Worm

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    thats pretty cool. its true about them always being mis-identified..i have a stray that resembles (could be a mix of) a pit...i have been told by people who were absolutely positive that he was about 8 of the breeds on that page..i was a little leary of him at first b/c of the stigma society has given these animals, but ive had him 3 years now and can attest he is the sweetest dog ive ever owned.

    [​IMG]

    ^^buster...looks real vicious dont he?
     
  3. Romitaz

    Romitaz Black Perc

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    Yes, I have two of them and wouldn't trade them for the world. I posted this after reading that some folks on here think that "Pitbulls" are vicious and I challenged them to see if what they thought was a pit really was one. It even took me two tries to get it right! Let's see if anyone can get it in one :)
     
  4. Romitaz

    Romitaz Black Perc

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    by the way, beautiful puppy! I'll post mine as soon as a find my camera.
     
  5. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    The pit subject came up because it was said that pits are sweet and not dangerous by nature. That's not true and it's irresponsible to state otherwise. You can't honestly say that a pit or any other agressive breed will be docile by nature if not properly raised. Your success - and I don't doubt it's true - in raising a loving, caring animal doesn't eliminate the inherent nature of the breed.
     
  6. Romitaz

    Romitaz Black Perc

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    Almost all breeds have an "inherant nature" to be agressive. They are predators. I'm just tired of people stating that pits are bad. They are no worse than most large breed dogs. Heck no worse than even some small breeds. Have you ever seen a p#ssed off Boston Terrier? They are down right scary! My in-laws have one and it beats up on the Catahoula, the Lab and our pits. :shock:
     
  7. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    my guess is..... 3, 13, or 22. Do you know the real answer ?
     
  8. Romitaz

    Romitaz Black Perc

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    By the way, the subject came up because someone stated that pitbulls are dangerous, not because someone stated they were harmless. Yes they are dangerous animals but so are most breeds of large animal. They just aren't "more dabgerous" than the rest. Has anyone read about the origin of the breed? They were bred to fight OTHER DOGS as a "Gentleman's Sport". Even then they were bred to fight only to submission. It was very frowned upon if the losing dog was killed. They were never bred to attack humans or anything else but other dogs. In fact, any individual dog that showed any aggression towards a human was destroyed. They were bred for intense loyalty to their human owners and it was this loyalty that drove them to fight other dogs. Now I don't want anyone to think that I advocate dog fights. I hate them. Especially now that I own two of the "bad pits". No one ever hears of the heroic feats that these dogs have done, only the bad. Like the pit that was shot six times in the chest by an intruder and still managed to protect it's master from being killed as well. How about the pit that got it's back legs crushed by a falling beam in a house fire but still managed to pull an unconsious boy out of the house to safety before falling over dead with burns on 80% of it's body. These never make the news because it might prove that the media wants you to believe that all pits are bad. How else are they going to sell stories? They must keep the stigma alive or else they have lost a good stand by story about a horrible pit attacking a kid. If the stigma was not out there, it would be just another "dog bites kid" story. That don't bring home the bacon.
     
  9. Romitaz

    Romitaz Black Perc

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    Carl, all of those are wrong. If you click on the photos, they will give you the name of the breed. Not as easy as you might have thought at first is it? Yes, I know which one it is. It just would defeat the purpose if I told :D
     
  10. Romitaz

    Romitaz Black Perc

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    Carl,your picks were: 3-Alapaha Blue Blood Bulldog, 13-Presa Canario, 22-Alano Espanol. All true breeds, and all not pits :) As an interesting side note, many of the attack by "pitbulls" turn out to be the Presa Canario which is bigger and stockier than the Pitbull Terrier. Don't feel bad. Most media outlets call the Presa Canario a pitbull as well. It is what most people think of when they think about what a pit looks like.(The more you know...)
     
  11. Coyle

    Coyle Ko-Ko Worm

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    thanks romitaz, that dog is a serious premadonna, he always poses for the camera...

    i dont think that any breed of dog is inherently aggressive, i think it really depends on the particular dog in question, not the breed...there are good eggs and bad eggs..just like people

    i picked the presa first too, and several others before i found the pitbull...that breed unlike pits was bred to attack humans..they were originally bred by the roman legions as war dogs, just a little FYI
     
  12. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    15,16 15 for sure
     
  13. bmb527

    bmb527 Marine Betta

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    Out of the many that look like the media's version of a pit, I know which it is. #18 is labeled as an Olde English Bulldog, which it is not. They made a typo.
    Outta all the dogs that aren't pits, they couldn't throw in an Akita pic for fun?! Only cause they are my family's favorite breed. Another terrible man eater. Funny that the person to bring the breed to the US was a little deaf and blind woman named Helen Keller!
    Bill
     
  14. Reef_Tank_Greg

    Reef_Tank_Greg Skimmate

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  15. Reef_Tank_Greg

    Reef_Tank_Greg Skimmate

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  16. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    http://www.dogbitelaw.com/breeds-causing-DBRFs.pdf

    Is this data wrong? These are just fatalities.

    Results
    Fatalities during 1997 and 1998—During 1997
    and 1998, at least 27 people died as the result of dog
    bite attacks (18 people in 1997 and 9 in 1998). Of 27
    human DBRF, 19 (70%) were children (1 was ≤ 30 days
    old, 3 were between 7 and 11 months old, 9 were
    between 1 and 4 years old, and 6 were between 5 and
    11 years old), and 8 were adults (ages 17, 44, 64, 70,
    73, 75, 75, and 87). Approximately half (n = 15 [56%])
    of the human DBRF were male.
    Five (19%) deaths involved unrestrained dogs off
    the owners’ property, 18 (67%) involved unrestrained
    dogs on the owners’ property,
    3 (11%) involved
    restrained dogs on the owners’ property, and 1 (4%)
    involved a restrained dog off the owner’s property.
    Eighteen (67%) deaths involved 1 dog, 5 (19%)
    involved 2 dogs, and 4 (15%) involved 3 dogs. Sixty
    percent of attacks by unrestrained dogs off the owners’
    property involved more than 1 dog.
    Fatal attacks were reported from 17 states
    (California [4 deaths]; Georgia and North Carolina [3
    each]; Kansas, Texas, and Wisconsin [2 each]; and
    Alaska, Arkansas, Colorado, Florida, Kentucky,
    Massachusetts, Michigan, Missouri, New York, South
    Dakota, and Tennessee [1 each]).
    Some breed information was reported for all 27
    attacks. As in recent years, Rottweilers were the most
    commonly reported breed involved in fatal attacks, followed
    by pit bull-type dogs (Table 1). Together, these
    2 breeds were involved in approximately 60% of
    human deaths.
     
  17. Coyle

    Coyle Ko-Ko Worm

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    ok pito..take that 27 deaths, and triple it since it only represents 1/3 of the states. also, as the link in this thread shows, many dogs are misrepresented as pitbulls, so that makes it:
    1) rottweiler
    2) about 20 breeds + mixes hodgepodged into one category as pitbulls
    *and it says rotts and pit like dogs represent 60% of the deaths..

    so that makes it (27 x 3) x .6 = 48.6 deaths between rotts and pits OVER 2 YEARS

    lets now compare the dog murders to another rampant killer in the USA...

    http://www.nata.org/publicinformation/f ... htning.pdf
    "Lightning kills about 100 people in the U.S. each year."

    http://www.benbest.com/lifeext/causes.html
    "the chance of being killed by lightning is less than one in 6 million in the United States."

    with those odds i would say that you did more to prove that pits (and "aggressive"dogs in general) are misrepresented than to prove they are killers..i am sorry for the people that did have a bad experience with a dog or lost a loved one, but as shown here they represent a TINY percentage of the population as a whole but are hyped up by the media (much like school shootings and serial murders)...AND should not be used to judge the aggressiveness of the animals..like i said before, with the millions of dogs in our country, there are bound to be some bad eggs.
     
  18. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    Those aren't my numbers. Comparable if not the same stats from the CDC. They are DEATHS, not including bites or attacks:

    http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/00047723.htm

    You're trying to elevate canines out of the animal kingdom and assign them human qualities, specifically the ability to control instinct, and that is very, very dangerous. At the end of the day dogs are still domesticated carnivorous pack animals and you have to respect that. It doesn't mean they aren't good pets in the proper hands. I'm sure if everyone was devoted as you we wouldn't be having this discussion.

    Take the reference in one of those links to the Chow that killed the newborn. I'm sure he/she was a loving animal. He didn't see a newborn baby, he saw a threat to his status in his "pack". That's why I gave away my 9 month old Dobe when my wife became pregnant. He would have thrown himself in traffic to protect my two-year old, he may have done the same for the baby; he may also have viewed him as a threat to his status and done what the Chow did.

    FWIW, I've owned two of those nine breeds. Nine breeds out of hundreds. MY beef is responsibility. Your beloved breed, in irresponsible hands, is EXTREMELY dangerous and it's disrespectful of the breed to claim otherwise.

    'nuff said on my part, outta here. I'll never get anywhere in a debate where CDC/Humane Society stats are challenged yet Wikipedia and fanboi sites as sources are not ;)
     
  19. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    I don't think anyone is implying that a pit is the best dog for EVERYONE, at least not from what I am reading. Despite the fact I have never owned a better dog, I would never suggest that. Duke and Geni both have strong personalities, and strong needs for human companionship. They both want to be "good dogs" and loathe being the "bad dog". But if I were not able to educate the dogs as to what they should be doing, and I was not able to give them the attention they require, there is no question they would be less than well behaved. Worse, because they are so eager for our approval, if I somehow encouraged aggressive behavior, to animals or people, my dogs would undoubtedly do whatever it took.

    So no, I don' t think Sean is implying that everyone should rush out and buy a pit bull. I think the point is that breed discrimination is a bad idea- especially when the populace has a hard time actually identifying the breed in question. In my opinion, the fault lies with the owner, who either thru neglect or willful encouragement allows a dog to become a threat to the public, regardless of breed. (Or species, for that matter- snakes, birds, fish, whatever.)

    Oh, and on the subject of children- all breeds are far more likely to bite children, simply due to the way children appear to a dog. They shriek, run, jump around, poke, pull ears, climb on backs, and do all sorts of things that larger humans don't generally do. Never trust ANY dog to not bite a child- regardless of breed. Teach your kids to respect that dogs ARE animals, and how to treat them. And ALWAYS monitor dogs and children.
     
  20. bmb527

    bmb527 Marine Betta

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    Of all of the "dangerous" breeds, i.e.: Pits (and all breeds mistaken for them), Rotties, Akitas, Tosa Inu etc, I have seen many more people get bitten by the "safe" family dogs. Fact is, most people that seek out a particular breed know of the tendencies of that breed and take steps to properly train the animal. It is the few that train these animals to be aggressive that are to blame for the resulting attacks.
    When I lived in Co., I was at an off leash dog park w/ my Akitas and a lady would not let her kid get near my dogs because of their reputation. I couldn't fault her for being cautious, they are a formidable animal at first sight. She didn't know the only damage they would do to her son is to lick him into a sloppy mess. Only for her kid to get badly bitten by a Black Lab.
    Also, the dogs most likely to bite a child are the toy breeds. They just don't have the power that others do that cause damage.
    Personally, I am weary around unfamilliar "pit-type" dogs, only because I don't know if the owner is an ethical dog owner, but I am cautious around ALL strange dogs.

    Instead of banning specific breeds, I say they should ban breeds with bad hair-do's... Poodles head up the list!!
    Bill
     

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