Isopods information link

Discussion in 'Reefer Quick Reference' started by BluewaterLa, Sep 26, 2017.

  1. BluewaterLa

    BluewaterLa LARC Boil Master Administrator LARC Supporter

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    http://www.reefkeeping.com/issues/2002-05/rs/

    This is just one link that will open the door for everyone to explore many more links and give you some words to google if you are interested in knowing more about these critters that could be in your tank.
    NO this is not an attempt to cause panic among members though it is something that many folks need to be aware of due to having some of these specimens pop up in reef aquariums.

    Isopods are commonly called Pill bugs, Rollie Pollies, and a whole slew of common names much like their Land dwelling relatives we all used to play with when we were children.
    There are several different types of differing body shapes, sizes, coloration as well as different "roles'' they have in our tanks. Some are just part of the clean up crew as algae eaters while others are parasitic on fish and shrimp, while some are just flat out predatory.
    In either case of parasitic or predatory Isopods can and will KILL fish. Parasitic usually latch on at night feeding on blood and drop off right after lights on while predatory once actively feed upon the fish until the food is gone being the fish. Parasitic Isopods feeding on the blood of the fish can cause inflammation in areas where they have fed and on smaller fish can lead to a quicker death while larger fish can tolerate this for longer unless the population is numerous.
    Plenty of information with pictures and descriptions of these crustaceans can be found easily.

    Note for the ones that are considered harmless to beneficial in our aquariums that eat algae primarily. They are the only KNOWN Isopod that can and will actually ''roll'' up like the land Pill bugs when they are handled.

    Most all of them are identifiable if enough time is taken to give the specimen a good look with a magnifying glass, doing things like counting segments and noting where certain legs are located or the shape of them.

    CAUTION -- Take care when handling one of these critters and do not allow one to sit on your skin without watching it closely as the ones that have spike like gripper forelegs use these to grasp prey or host while a second set of legs are like scalpels and SOME species can burrow into human flesh rather quick.

    As with anything that could be this or that without being certain about Identification you have two choices.
    1) destroy the critter/ not putting it back into the tank to be safe.
    2) Place the critter into a small cup with tank water or similar container and take many photographs then post them on Larc so others can help ID said critter while you do some leg work too.
    With option two you are giving the chance for you/others to learn something all the while you may just find out that you have an interesting Harmless/ beneficial critter in your ecosystem.
    After all if something is not ''bad'' for the tank or its inhabitants why not enjoy the diversity.

    If anyone finds a good link they would like to add in this thread to share with others please feel free.
    There are a ton of links out there, some great and some not so great.

    As always good luck and happy reefing
    BluewaterLa/ Mike.
     
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  2. BluewaterLa

    BluewaterLa LARC Boil Master Administrator LARC Supporter

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    I would like to invite my friend @Razzmatazz to post up her video she sent me showing one isopod she found in her filter sock recently.
    After much eye strain and reading through some books looking at pictures and online searching I am pretty certain the one she found is part of the Sphaeomatid(s) Isopod which would be the best case being the ones that roll up like the land ones do and information points to harmless/ beneficial algae grazers.

    Angie did the one you find roll up at any point ??
    Ill watch the video again to see if it did or not on camera.
     
  3. BluewaterLa

    BluewaterLa LARC Boil Master Administrator LARC Supporter

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    tongueisopod.jpg

    image001.jpg

    isopodnew.jpg

    giant-isopod-deep-sea-creature.jpg

    The first one is parasitic eating the fish tongue and then replacing the eaten body part.
    The second and third are more common ones seen in the hobby.
    The last picture is of a giant specimen as some get large and in charge eating carrion and preying upon fish.

    They are quite fast and hide well in the sand and live rock so just think about that next time you dig around in your tank 'welcomeg''freelaughing'
     
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  4. 6lilfish

    6lilfish Ko-Ko Worm

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    I sent Bobby some pictues a few years ago of one. That is why I QT.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G935A using Tapatalk
     
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  5. Razzmatazz

    Razzmatazz Marine Betta Global Moderator LARC Supporter

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    I’m trying to upload the video but it is too large. What hosting site can I use to post a link to?
     
  6. Humblefish

    Humblefish Dr. Fish Administrator LARC Supporter

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    You can copy & paste a Youtube URL right into the text box (i.e. here).
     
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  7. The GOB

    The GOB Harlequin Tusk

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    Cirolanids are on my list of crap hitch hikers I've encountered. Never tried trapping them but cooking the rock sure as hell killed em. Luckily they were in one of my early tanks and there wasn't much rock. Another reason why nothing but cured dry rock is going in the new tank.
     
  8. clsanchez77

    clsanchez77 Reefkeeping Extremist Global Moderator

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  9. Razzmatazz

    Razzmatazz Marine Betta Global Moderator LARC Supporter

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    I finally figured out YouTube, here ya go;

     
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  10. Razzmatazz

    Razzmatazz Marine Betta Global Moderator LARC Supporter

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  11. clsanchez77

    clsanchez77 Reefkeeping Extremist Global Moderator

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    My wife and I used to watch the Colbert Report and I just vividly remember that specific clip LOL
     
  12. BluewaterLa

    BluewaterLa LARC Boil Master Administrator LARC Supporter

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    IMG_0065.JPG So I spent some time peeling shrimp locally caught in the lake.
    It is no surprise that occasionally I find critters like mantis shrimp among other by-catch though sometimes I get to thinking WAY too much after discovering some things lurking in local waters where I grew up swimming and now do so with my family.
    Check this photos out and keep in mind that it was among my shrimp and came from the Lake.
    IMG_0066.JPG IMG_0067.JPG IMG_0068.JPG
     
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