Stand build

Discussion in 'D.I.Y.' started by Jcraft, May 21, 2006.

  1. Jcraft

    Jcraft Harlequin Tusk

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    Im planning on getting a 120 in the next couple months. Instead of spending $500 on a stand I figured I'd give it a go.

    I have very little experience with woodworking, so this could be interesting (and fun! (frustrating?)). What I do have though is creativity- so bear with me


    After spending the last couple days looking at designs and such I have come up with this rough sketch
    [​IMG]

    Im colorblind, so I wont name the colors, but here's the gist:
    Two Oak panels measuring 24"x48" - these will serve as both the bottom and top pieces.
    Five 2x4's (white pine I think) to connect the top to the bottom
    2x4's to brace the top and distribute the weight evenly.

    Hopefully this isn't TOO overdone

    The future plan after getting the frame together will be 1/2" hardwood (still undecided) paneling for the sides and front, crown moulding to create a "shelf" at the top and to hide the black bottom rim of the stand.
    Still undecided about the doors- I'll probably make that decision once the moulding is decided upon.

    What do ya'll think? Construction should begin next week
     
  2. ronniem

    ronniem Spiny Star Astraea

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    Your top rail should rest on top of your corner post.
     
  3. Jcraft

    Jcraft Harlequin Tusk

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    those rails are just for added support.

    The top piece will be a 3/4" Oak sheet, identical to the bottom.
    the rails just add more structural integrity.

    When i was designing it, i looked at how the Oceanic oak stands are built- this one is similiar
     
  4. citation83bravo

    citation83bravo Cleaner Shrimp

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    my stand is the perfect example of over-engineering..i have a 65 gallon tank but my stand could prob handle a 200 gallon.. i still dont have any pics up though...someone should let me borrow one of those nikons
     
  5. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    I would use a good waterproof wood glue (Tightbond 3) and screws insted of nails. predrill the screw holes. Slightly larger than the screw thru the part being screwed thru and same size as the screw shank in the part being screwed into. This will give you nice tight joints without splitting either piece.
    my $.02
     
  6. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    I built the stand for my 210, well over built probably could park a car on it. made out of 2X6's.
     
  7. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

  8. Jcraft

    Jcraft Harlequin Tusk

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    do ya'll think the middle support at the back will be needed?

    I was looking over the way Oceanic builds their stand and ona 140 there is no middle support . . .

    seems like I could get away without it

    I could put 2x4's on the bottom sides and back, just like the top, but I would rather keep the front open if possible.

    would it be better to use 2x6's in place of the 2x4's for the column supports?
     
  9. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    its kinda like boobs man. the bigger the better :shock:
     
  10. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    I don't think you should have a 2x4 spanning over 3 feet with no support - not with the weight a 120 is going to put on it. It will, at best, sag over time and provide no support to the center of the tank. At worst it will fail catastrophically. With no support a 2x6 would be the minimum, but I still wouldn't span that much.

    I agree with cajunpuffer, in principal this is what he meant (click for bigger pic):
    [​IMG]
    The weight is distributed on the rails (tan), which are sitting on the support or jack studs (blue). Even if you put a sheet of plywood on top a la Oceanic, the weight is still transferred to the jack studs. You could also put this together with glue. This stand is probably overkill, but you'll sleep at night. It could be skinned with 1/4 plywood, reducing cost quite a bit.

    Lot's of variations on this design (1x4 instead of 2x4 and skin with 3/4 plywood, e.g.) are possible. The important thing is to have the weight of the tank on the "jacks" and .

    For access to the front or back of the stand, the center supports could be removable - use screw plates on the inside.
     
  11. ronniem

    ronniem Spiny Star Astraea

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    Pito thanks for the sketch, thats how I built my stand. 2x4 framed with 1/2" skin on front and sides, 3/4" on top. It has a 125gl on it but I sleep well knowing I could park my dodge on it. :lol:
     
  12. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    ROTFL ... that one caught me off guard!

    PITO: that's how I built mine also. Great sketch and comments on how DIY stands should be built.
     
  13. Anonymous

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  14. Jcraft

    Jcraft Harlequin Tusk

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    thanks for all the comments/suggestions!

    After playing around with my designs and some of your's Ive decided to do the stand in the same manner that Pito and Imperatorfan has done/suggested. It seems to be a proven method.

    The one difference I will be making is the wood that will be used. I went out today and bought 1x4's and 1x1's of white pine. I know the majority of people use the 2x4's but I'm trying to save weight where I can and after looking over TONS of designs and stand build threads I've noticed that the 2x4's are more than enough for tanks over 200g- i figure going with the 1x4's will work just as well for a 120

    I also have been corresponding with a friend who is a mechanical engineer. The build should easily be able to hold the 1,200lbs or so.

    anyways, construction begins Thursday!
     
  15. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    heres how mine was built. It was built with 2x4's

    [​IMG]

    The front has one vertical support, and the back has two.

    heres another angle

    [​IMG]

    Hope this helps ya some.

    -Mike
     
  16. ronniem

    ronniem Spiny Star Astraea

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    If you have a 120gl then I would figure a save estimate of 12lbs per gallon when filled. That comes out to 1440lbs. Just something to think about. I am not an engineer nor do I know the working load of a 1x or a 2x.
    Just some food for thought
     
  17. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    I hope you meant 2x2 instead of 1x1? That's not much bigger than a thick dowel ;) Don't think I'd want a 1x1 for anything structural on a stand for a 120!

    Mike - nice stand frame. Provides the same support with less wood and more space inside the cabinet - that's how I would build my next stand. What type of joinery was used? I've been drooling over some of the pocket joiner kits out there.
     
  18. Jcraft

    Jcraft Harlequin Tusk

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    well, new update.

    While the engineers at CDI engineering here in town feel confident that the 1x4's would hold if properly braced, it seems not many others do.

    My friends father owns Parish Home Center in Zachary and he's going to be able to get me the frame wood for cheap so I'll probably go ahead and do the 2x4's then skin it with hardwood. I just hope it doesn't weigh a ton :lol:

    as far as hardwood goes, what kind's do ya'll suggest?
    Anybody heard of "sunken cypress"?
     
  19. phatstanley02

    phatstanley02 Ko-Ko Worm

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    maple is nice
     
  20. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    I don't have any experience with it, but I think sunken cypress would be expensive and difficult to get (especially right now). I'd recommend you go with something that you can easily find in both ply and solid wood.

    Maple is nice - I think it's good for lighter color'd finishes
    red oak - ply and solid available at HD
    mahogony is really sweet IMO if you're looking for a real formal kind of finish
     

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