HELP Acanthastrea

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hello, I'm almost a beginner, do you think this acanthastrea is healthy?
Thanks
6a4c39b26a36564a5ad3dbf557e62a83.jpg
 

BluewaterLa

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From what I can tell from the picture, the coral tissue has been lost over time from either lack of nutrients or too much light intensity.
Could be both.
I would move it to a lower light area of the tank and try to spot feed the coral at night when feeding tentacles are out.
Coral can recover in time, as of now it is not healthy.
 

Riccardo Maria Pesce

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From what I can tell from the picture, the coral tissue has been lost over time from either lack of nutrients or too much light intensity.
Could be both.
I would move it to a lower light area of the tank and try to spot feed the coral at night when feeding tentacles are out.
Coral can recover in time, as of now it is not healthy.

Thank you for your tip, I moved the coral over some rock. I exclude the lack of nutrients, I feed it directly and with reef snow and coral integrators. I also reduced the intensity of my lights a bit. I hope it will recover soon.
Thanks again
 

CenlaReefer

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Good advice, @BluewaterLa !

Hi Riccardo! Welcome to LARC! It is great that we have a member from Italy! That is a gorgeous color pattern you have on that acan! If you are feeding the tank well, it is very likely the light intensity is your culpret. Some people do not like the way that tabling /plating montipora can shade coral below them, yet such corals can provide service for lower light corals like acans or other LPS.

How are your parameters? How are your other corals doing?
 
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clsanchez77

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Welcome to Louisiana! You will fit right in with our own resident Italian families lol.

As mentioned, the coral is not looking good. I would agree to reduce the lighting, which will slow the coral's metabolism down. Acans are what we in the hobby will group together as "LPS", and these corals generally will like to be fed. Once your lights are off for about an hour, look for the tentacles to be extended. This is when you want to feed. The thing with LPS corals is that they respond very slowly. My guess is this coral tissue recession has persisted for quite some time and it took a while for you to take notice. So do not be surprised that when you take corrective actions, the corals may not respond favorably for quite a few days. Growth will take longer.

As @CenlaReefer asked, how are your reef parameters doing? Are you checking them? Salinity, temperature, nitrate, phosphate, alkalinity, calcium, magnesium are all important. pH is not as important, but can indicate that alkalinity or dissolved CO2 are out of spec.

Also, what filtration are you running? How is this filtration performing? LPS like Acans can be tricky with water quality. While you cannot neglect the tank and allow it to waste, you also have to be careful not to over filter it either. If you have any SPS corals that are doing well, and the acan is struggling, this is a completely different problem from all of your corals are struggling. You could be over skimming or under skimming.

Finally, you say you are new....how new? Is this by chance your first/only coral? If so, I would suggest you get some zoanthid or palythoa polyps to pair with your coral. These are among the easiest of corals to maintain and will help you hone in and develop the skills. In the future, if you have one coral struggling, but other corals to compare it to, it helps narrow down causes and correction.
 

CenlaReefer

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My wife's parents are from Philadelphia and are both 100% Italian. She wants to know if you are still living in Italy and what region/area.
 

Riccardo Maria Pesce

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Good advice, @BluewaterLa !

Hi Riccardo! Welcome to LARC! It is great that we have a member from Italy! That is a gorgeous color pattern you have on that acan! If you are feeding the tank well, it is very likely the light intensity is your culpret. Some people do not like the way that tabling /plating montipora can shade coral below them, yet such corals can provide service for lower light corals like acans or other LPS.

How are your parameters? How are your other corals doing?

Welcome to Louisiana! You will fit right in with our own resident Italian families lol.

As mentioned, the coral is not looking good. I would agree to reduce the lighting, which will slow the coral's metabolism down. Acans are what we in the hobby will group together as "LPS", and these corals generally will like to be fed. Once your lights are off for about an hour, look for the tentacles to be extended. This is when you want to feed. The thing with LPS corals is that they respond very slowly. My guess is this coral tissue recession has persisted for quite some time and it took a while for you to take notice. So do not be surprised that when you take corrective actions, the corals may not respond favorably for quite a few days. Growth will take longer.

As @CenlaReefer asked, how are your reef parameters doing? Are you checking them? Salinity, temperature, nitrate, phosphate, alkalinity, calcium, magnesium are all important. pH is not as important, but can indicate that alkalinity or dissolved CO2 are out of spec.

Also, what filtration are you running? How is this filtration performing? LPS like Acans can be tricky with water quality. While you cannot neglect the tank and allow it to waste, you also have to be careful not to over filter it either. If you have any SPS corals that are doing well, and the acan is struggling, this is a completely different problem from all of your corals are struggling. You could be over skimming or under skimming.

Finally, you say you are new....how new? Is this by chance your first/only coral? If so, I would suggest you get some zoanthid or palythoa polyps to pair with your coral. These are among the easiest of corals to maintain and will help you hone in and develop the skills. In the future, if you have one coral struggling, but other corals to compare it to, it helps narrow down causes and correction.

well, these are my parameters:
Salinity: 34-35 ‰
temperature: 25
Mg: 1340
Ca: 430
nitrate: ~ 7mg / l
phosphate: l
KH: 8
potassium: 400
i make osmosis water by myself, TDS are 0. my tank is a 65 liters (~ 17 gallons), with a deltek MCE 400. i started my first tank almost a year ago, i have 2 eupyllia (very grown lately), a lobophyton, a truly expanded clavularia virdis, two discosomes and a small tridacna (and two ocellaris). I also have an SPS but I forgot the name, linked a photo.
2ea7ffce255552d259ed07c31d0289b9.jpg
 

BluewaterLa

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Your clam will definitely have similar lighting requirements as the Pocilipora nugget you have in the tank.
I would not lower your lighting for one coral in the tank for sake of the others.
Instead what I would do is to just move the struggling Acan to a more shaded spot with a little less light and continue to feed the coral two or three times per week.
Lowering the entire lighting intensity on the whole tank can cause issues slowly for your other corals and IF they are all doing fine with exception to the Acan then move the Acan.

Oddly enough I have a mixed reef, The only coral I struggle to keep healthy is Acans.
I have four different Blasto colonies doing very well in this tank but the Acans are a no go coral for me somehow
Sometimes we have this issue with one coral or another.
 

clsanchez77

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Oddly enough I have a mixed reef, The only coral I struggle to keep healthy is Acans.
I have four different Blasto colonies doing very well in this tank but the Acans are a no go coral for me somehow
Sometimes we have this issue with one coral or another.
I recall from my short-lived big nation;/global forum days that this was a common problem. Acans, like scolymias, just have such a narrow band of environmental requirements that its hard to keep them in tanks where other corals thrive.
 

Riccardo Maria Pesce

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I recall from my short-lived big nation;/global forum days that this was a common problem. Acans, like scolymias, just have such a narrow band of environmental requirements that its hard to keep them in tanks where other corals thrive.

Your clam will definitely have similar lighting requirements as the Pocilipora nugget you have in the tank.
I would not lower your lighting for one coral in the tank for sake of the others.
Instead what I would do is to just move the struggling Acan to a more shaded spot with a little less light and continue to feed the coral two or three times per week.
Lowering the entire lighting intensity on the whole tank can cause issues slowly for your other corals and IF they are all doing fine with exception to the Acan then move the Acan.

Oddly enough I have a mixed reef, The only coral I struggle to keep healthy is Acans.
I have four different Blasto colonies doing very well in this tank but the Acans are a no go coral for me somehow
Sometimes we have this issue with one coral or another.

Ok. I moved the acan, the light stays the same (30% white, 85% blue using a GNC silver moon and a bluereef gnc). How long do you think it takes for acan to show the first signs of healing? To find out if the location in the tank is okay
 

clsanchez77

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LPS already are very slow to grow/heal. I can't tell you how long it will take to show signs of healing. I would say though in 2-3 days, you should know if it is continuing to recede. It's hard to tell from visual observation, so use photos to track progress. You just need to stop the tissue recession. If you can stop that, the healing will come on its own.
 

BluewaterLa

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Several weeks to couple months would be a time frame to see some improvement.
Good days and after feeding the tissue will look / appear to be more fluffy, this is normal and not a sign or tissue regeneration.
As mentioned above time is what is needed and no one can predict the recovery.
Lower light will give the coral time to rest and adding amino acids a couple times per week give the coral nutrition to easily absorb into the tissue which takes very little energy compared to food capture and digestion.

Depending on how stressed to coral is and how strong it may be will be the difference in one or more of the heads surviving and making recovery to split and duplicate over time.
Normally when that much tissue is lost the coral is really in bad shape, It can make a full recovery just as well continue to decline no matter what can be done to help it at this point.
Focus on maintaining water parameters with good balance of dissolved nutrition and that will give all coral the best chances of remaining healthy and or healing.
 
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