My wannabe reef 36 bow

Users who are viewing this thread

Eileash

Peppermint Shrimp
Joined
Jan 8, 2017
Messages
92
Location
New Orleans
Just started this tank Dec 1, 2016. Tank was given to me from a friend. Seaclone filter, modded aqueon whisper, stock coralife light, given heater. Used only RODI to start. 30lbs live sand, 40+lbs dry rock. Added handful of snails and hermit crabs Jan 3. Added 1 emerald crab and 2 snowflake (?) clowns yesterday, Jan 13. Been testing with my refractometer, API tests (fresh and reef).

IMG_1791.JPG
IMG_1801.JPG
IMG_1806.JPG
IMG_1922.JPG
IMG_1923.JPG
 

clsanchez77

Reefkeeping Extremist
Global Moderator
Joined
Aug 3, 2015
Messages
9,746
Location
Metairie
No reef starts with a coral. They start with invert life, algae and then fish :D You are on your way.
 

Eileash

Peppermint Shrimp
Thread starter
Joined
Jan 8, 2017
Messages
92
Location
New Orleans
Yeah. Definitely something I'm getting used to. In the planted tank, you can almost throw the plants in there Day 1. Corals are more months down the line after everything else. The planted tank, my priority and motivation for even getting the tank was the plants. Same with the salted, the priority is corals. Certainly a practice in patience.
 

Eileash

Peppermint Shrimp
Thread starter
Joined
Jan 8, 2017
Messages
92
Location
New Orleans
Next upgrade will be the lights. Leaning towards the coralife quad fixture. Not sure yet though.
 

BluewaterLa

LARC Boil Master
Administrator
LARC Supporter
Joined
Jun 17, 2014
Messages
9,640
Location
Slidell
Looking good so far, in no time you will start to experience the ''uglies'' stage of your tank.
All sorts of algae will bloom making your tank appear dirty or not so good looking.
Keep up your husbandry and all will be fine, as your tank gets more mature and reaches a biological balance it will start to look better and better.
 

Eileash

Peppermint Shrimp
Thread starter
Joined
Jan 8, 2017
Messages
92
Location
New Orleans
Update: new shark nose goby and feather duster as of 1/23/17. I've been eyeing the feather duster for a while. A little concerned with it more than the goby, but we'll see.

Also, as strange as it sounds, I was actually getting a bit concerned that I wasn't getting much algae or blooms of any kind. Finally got some. You can see it more in the feather duster photo. I was a little worried the CUC would wither away. Not anymore!

I think I decided what light to go with. My budget for lights is 200$. Think I'm going with the Odyessa halogen, t5, led combo 30". It's a cheap light, but for now, will give me a lot of bang for my buck- I hope. Welcome to suggestions though. Thanks :)
50690029428__57D6F7F1-9F6D-4B35-AE5A-BDFD108C1B60.JPG
50690031427__CD50A4DD-3075-452C-9DDD-D301FC71C9CA.JPG
 

clsanchez77

Reefkeeping Extremist
Global Moderator
Joined
Aug 3, 2015
Messages
9,746
Location
Metairie
Update: new shark nose goby and feather duster as of 1/23/17. I've been eyeing the feather duster for a while. A little concerned with it more than the goby, but we'll see.

Also, as strange as it sounds, I was actually getting a bit concerned that I wasn't getting much algae or blooms of any kind. Finally got some. You can see it more in the feather duster photo. I was a little worried the CUC would wither away. Not anymore!

I think I decided what light to go with. My budget for lights is 200$. Think I'm going with the Odyessa halogen, t5, led combo 30". It's a cheap light, but for now, will give me a lot of bang for my buck- I hope. Welcome to suggestions though. Thanks :)
View attachment 3133 View attachment 3132

A few things, but don't be discouraged, I am awful with bed side manners.

First, great score on the sharknose goby. These are actually fairly rare compared to their cousins, the neon goby.

Second, the initial algae bloom is a catch-22. You need some life in the tank to trigger it, but you want to stock up cautiously so you don't put in anything sensitive. But now that it is going, that is great. Just don't stock up on any corals until you get passed it.

Third issue is I am concerned about the feather duster. They are purely filter feeders and it takes a very mature tank to keep them fed. You are going to want to feed phytoplankton and rotifers as with feather dusters, it is all about particle size. Phytoplankton and rotifers are the only thing we have down to the 1 micron particle size. They also are suspected to feed on suspended bacteria, but that is not something you add to the tank but rather is something your tank will produce on its own as you are further along. The great news is if you can keep the feather duster alive, then your tank will also support sponges, tunicates and other filter feeders.

Lastly on the light, I am not sure about using a halogen light on a reef tank. If you are not going with corals, then it should be fine. If you are going with corals, I'm concerned your light spectrum will be of little use. Your planted tanks thrived under lights calibrated in the red and blue wavelengths. Coral tanks, need a bluer blue (Royal Blue or Actinic Blue) and some ultraviolet wavelengths. As you then move through the cyans, greens, yellows and reds, the amount of lighted needed diminishes quickly and just are not needed...in fact, at the lower reef depths, those colors just don't exist. If you are limited on funds, your best option would be a straight HO fixture...no LEDs, MHs or Halogens. There are some impressive top notch SPS coral tanks still maintained with only HO bulbs and this is your cheapest acceptable option.
 

Eileash

Peppermint Shrimp
Thread starter
Joined
Jan 8, 2017
Messages
92
Location
New Orleans
A few things, but don't be discouraged, I am awful with bed side manners.

First, great score on the sharknose goby. These are actually fairly rare compared to their cousins, the neon goby.

Second, the initial algae bloom is a catch-22. You need some life in the tank to trigger it, but you want to stock up cautiously so you don't put in anything sensitive. But now that it is going, that is great. Just don't stock up on any corals until you get passed it.

Third issue is I am concerned about the feather duster. They are purely filter feeders and it takes a very mature tank to keep them fed. You are going to want to feed phytoplankton and rotifers as with feather dusters, it is all about particle size. Phytoplankton and rotifers are the only thing we have down to the 1 micron particle size. They also are suspected to feed on suspended bacteria, but that is not something you add to the tank but rather is something your tank will produce on its own as you are further along. The great news is if you can keep the feather duster alive, then your tank will also support sponges, tunicates and other filter feeders.

Lastly on the light, I am not sure about using a halogen light on a reef tank. If you are not going with corals, then it should be fine. If you are going with corals, I'm concerned your light spectrum will be of little use. Your planted tanks thrived under lights calibrated in the red and blue wavelengths. Coral tanks, need a bluer blue (Royal Blue or Actinic Blue) and some ultraviolet wavelengths. As you then move through the cyans, greens, yellows and reds, the amount of lighted needed diminishes quickly and just are not needed...in fact, at the lower reef depths, those colors just don't exist. If you are limited on funds, your best option would be a straight HO fixture...no LEDs, MHs or Halogens. There are some impressive top notch SPS coral tanks still maintained with only HO bulbs and this is your cheapest acceptable option.
First, thanks for all of your input. I keep reading and reading and reading like an obsession. But experience is what I really need, and advice from those with it is valuable.

While my intentions are for coral, I have no interest in putting coral in my very not mature tank and my non experienced hands, dooming the coral for death. I don't actually plan on getting any coral for at LEAST another month. Even then, it'll be one at a time with lots of breaks between. I keep reading things about the "chemical warfare" that goes on when they're stressed and I have no intentions of killing the whole thing because I wasn't patient enough. So the bloom for me is simply confirming I'm doing something normal and in the right path, though stumbling a little blind lol.

I didn't realize the worm needed such specific food. I read some where that fan worms were an invert that was often overlooked as a member of a CUC. Perhaps the diet is why.

Finally, I thought halides were good for SPS types corals, though I won't be really going for SPS. The T5's were going to be actinic, providing the blue you mention. So, with your advice about the lights, I'm actually now a little confused on what light is best, within a 200$ budget.
 

clsanchez77

Reefkeeping Extremist
Global Moderator
Joined
Aug 3, 2015
Messages
9,746
Location
Metairie
chemical warfare
Don't over stress on this issue. First its very easily managed with carbon, secondly its really an issue with over crowding the soft corals than stress. Most corals don't wipe out tanks so you are ok :)

I read some where that fan worms were an invert that was often overlooked as a member of a CUC.
Please share with me where you read that. That is very much a misstatement. If there is one thing that is abused and mis-stated in this hobby, it is the concept of a cleanup crew. I have gotten to the point that I hate the phrase cleanup crew. Fan worms, for example, do not scurry around the tank in search of nuisance algae and detritus. If anything, they eat the food that could be feeding amphipods, with are really good scavengers...and also feed your corals and fish a source of live food. Im not saying get rid of it, Im just saying they are not cleanup crew anymore than a coral is.

On the lights, you said halogen and that had me concerned. There are not reef halogens.

I think this fixture might fit your tank...how much flexibility you have on your budget...20% :D
http://www.marinedepot.com/Coralife...r_Aquariums-Coralife-ES08604-FILTFIT5-vi.html
This fixture will also allow grow your corals nicely.

Now regarding your concerns about corals...its not as hard as you think. As a planted tank person, you already have a keen eye for water quality and detail needs of your plants. Corals are the same...except they need to eat too :D

There is a natural progression in the hobby that you can follow. Start off with just polyps and/or soft corals. These are easy. Then as you get comfortable with them, work on some of the easier LPS corals, which will mostly be the branching ones. These are slow growing stony corals that resemble soft corals when extended. I will put hammer corals and trumpet corals in this category. From there, you could move on the massing LPS corals, such as the favias (my favorites) and acans (most other peoples favorites). From there you can make the jump to the easier SPS corals (anything not an acropora) and then eventually the acropora's (holy grail of reef keeping according to most people). After the acros you then get into NPS corals. Im not saying your feather duster won't live, but they would thrive in a NPS style tank.
 

Eileash

Peppermint Shrimp
Thread starter
Joined
Jan 8, 2017
Messages
92
Location
New Orleans
Thanks. This is great.

Of course I can't find the exact article, but it was similar to this one: https://reefcorner.com/reef-database-index/hitchhiker-index/fan-worm/
The specific article I read from though also mentioned pods as an "overlooked CUC member". I did place a small piece of live rock in with the dry rock when I set up. Part of my excitement today was seeing a small little bug thing too - pod maybe? Don't know. Just happy to see progression of some form that is supporting life of some kind. I guess I have low standards LOL! "Look! Martians!"

Thanks for the suggestion for the light. I think part of what gets me confused while reading is some advice is likely better for much larger tanks with higher demands, and some advice is for tanks as small as 10 gallons.

That's a great progression-list of corals. Makes it much easier to navigate really. I know beginners corals are soft corals, but there are SO MANY! It's overwhelming. LPS are the same too. Then mix in words like "chemical warfare" and it's really intimidating. Thanks for clearing the mud though.

I guess I'll just have to list the worm as the first of many mistakes to come. Thankfully, it's a less expensive mistake. Unfortunate, but I was bound to lose one eventually.

Thanks again.
 

clsanchez77

Reefkeeping Extremist
Global Moderator
Joined
Aug 3, 2015
Messages
9,746
Location
Metairie
I guess I'll just have to list the worm as the first of many mistakes to come. Thankfully, it's a less expensive mistake. Unfortunate, but I was bound to lose one eventually.

Thanks again.

Just target feed him some food juice and he will be happy. Use a plastic turkey baster. Eventually your will have enough pod life in your tank to keep him fed. Also, every time you wipe your glass clean, you are feeding your filter feeders such as the fan worms.
 

Eileash

Peppermint Shrimp
Thread starter
Joined
Jan 8, 2017
Messages
92
Location
New Orleans
Just target feed him some food juice and he will be happy. Use a plastic turkey baster. Eventually your will have enough pod life in your tank to keep him fed. Also, every time you wipe your glass clean, you are feeding your filter feeders such as the fan worms.
Oh good! He can be saved. I'll go pick some up tomorrow. Awesome. Thanks
 
Top